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New Liberty Bloody Butcher Bourbon Review


So the story behind New Liberty Distillery’s Bloody Butcher Bourbon goes like this…

In the early 1800s, European settlers in the southern United States blended their corn with a native variety. The result was Bloody Butcher corn: instantly recognizable for its striking deep red kernels and legendary fruity, buttery flavor. Unsuitable for industrial scale farming, this heirloom variety is grown by only a few farmers.

New Liberty Bloody Butcher Bourbon celebrates our nation’s early agricultural heritage. We sourced Bloody Butcher corn from Castle Valley Mill in Doylestown, PA, just 25 miles from our distillery, and combined it with malted rye and barley from Deer Creek Malthouse. This blend of corn, barley, and rye gives the bourbon a balanced flavor, with notes of milk chocolate, butter, leather, and stone fruit on the palate, and a dry spice on the finish.

You have to wonder what the early 1800s were like when you name your agricultural product Bloody Butcher. It all sounds a little terrifying to us!

But you know what’s not terrifying? Bourbons made with that terrifyingly named corn. We’ve been lucky enough to try a Bloody Butcher corn whiskey or two and have been quite pleased with the flavor every single time. To find out if New Liberty’s version of Bloody Butcher is as delicious as the other versions we’ve sampled, click play on the following video to hear our many thoughts:

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4 replies »

  1. You forgot the moldy corn flavor. I’ve had feed corn stored in a galvanized trash can get wet and ferment on a hot summer day that develops this smell and burns that moldy flavor in your lungs from breathing it in.

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