Booze Banter

Cider Review – Shacksbury Rosé Cider


Whenever we gather at The Murder Table for a research session, we like to maximize our time and review a wide variety of beverages. Although Whisk(e)y and Craft Beer are our usual focus, we’re always willing to mix things up a bit.

After a recent research session where we reviewed several whiskies (seven to be exact), we decided to review something a little different. That something a little different was a Rosè cider from Shacksbury of Vergennes, Vermont which I just happened to have two of in my refrigerator. We called this part of the evening, The Digestif Round.

Here’s what Shacksbury has to say about their Rosé Cider:

Dry, Crushable and made like a rosé wine.

When we set out to make a rosé cider, we knew we wanted to pay homage to our friends in the winemaking world. Unlike many commercial ciders that rely on food coloring or additives to achieve a “rose pink” blush, our rose gets its color and flavor from grape skins — just, as we believe, like a rosé should. We start with fresh New England apples, pressed and fermented at cellar temperature; then age our cider on Syrah and Zinfandel grape skins to impart tannin, structure, and berry notes. We source grape skins from California because we cannot find a high enough quantity here in the Northeast. Together, these add up to a fun-loving but refined marriage of New England apples with traditional wine grapes, as tasty as it is beautiful.

Fun-loving and refined??? If we didn’t know any better, we’d think they were talking about us! Cause you know, we’re most definitely fun-loving, and there’s no doubt that we’re refined. As refined as Top Tier high-test gasoline. Vroom Vroom!

Anyway…

To see and hear all that we had to say about this delicious sounding Cider from Vergennes, Vermont, click the play button on the following video:

If you like what you saw and heard, please subscribe to our blog and YouTube Channel. It’s the easiest and BEST way to find out what we’ll be tasting next!

1 reply »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.